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Us Mens Open Tennis

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Meet the men - s US Open qualifiers

Meet the men´s US Open qualifiers

Tennis - Teenagers, Veterans and Journeyman take their place in the men´s singles draw

It’s hard work coming through the qualifying draw at any Grand Slam event. Playing three matches while hoping to get a chance to appear on the biggest stage in your sport must surely be a nerve-wracking experience for most people but for those who make it through, the reward is substantial.

The guaranteed pay check for making it to the main draw could be the biggest of their season and many players, who gain direct entry into the main draw, are wary of playing a qualifier, who already has three wins under their belt, first up.

On Friday, the qualifying event for the US Open wrapped up and 16 men booked their spot in the main draw. Among them were a few teenagers, some veterans and several journeymen. Here’s our look at the 16 players who will be hoping to extend their run in New York, one round at a time.

17-year-old Borna Coric is one of the few teenagers ranked inside the top 200 in the world currently and obviously there is plenty of excitement around the 6 ft 1 inch Croatian. And why shouldn’t there be? Coric is a former junior world no.

1, the youngest player in the main draw and the first boys champion to appear in the men’s draw the following year here at the US Open since Andy Murray in 2005. The right-hander already has a win over big-serving Pole Jerzy Janowicz in the Davis Cup this year, and in July, he reached his first ATP Tour quarter-final in his home event in Umag.

The teenager dropped only one set in his three matches this week, which included a win over another highly touted teen – the American Stefan Kozlov – and his reward is a first-round match-up against the hard-hitting 29th seeded Czech Lukas Rosol.

But a shoulder injury sustained during that match forced him to withdraw prior to his second round match and went on to derail the rest of his season, requiring surgery. Since returning in June, Darcis has now won 19 of 25 matches, including an ITF Future title and his three wins this week.

Darcis, who did not lose a set in qualifying, meets Slovak left-hander Martin Klizan in the first round and could meet sixth seed Tomas Berdych or former world no. 1 Lleyton Hewitt in the second round.

JAMES McGEE One of the more heart-warming stories to come out of the qualifying draw has to be that of Irish man James McGee.

The 27-year-old broke into tears after overcoming cramps late in the third set to beat China’s Ze Zhang and book his place in the main draw. That was after he came from 3-5 down to beat India’s Yuki Bhambri in the second round. Mcgee’s reward is a first-round meeting with Kazakh Aleksandr Nedovyesov and a guaranteed pay check of $36,000, which is almost a quarter of all the prize money he has earned during his career yet.

I'm overwhelmed with all the messages after today-thank you so much. The win today meant the world to me. #mydream pic.twitter.com/fybWcPlKiQ — James McGee (@jamesmcgee01) August 23, 2014 FILIP KRAJINOVIC Back in June 2010, Filip Krajinovic was only 18 years old and already ranked no.

170 in the world, marking himself as one of the top teenagers in the game. But a shoulder injury which required surgery forced him off the circuit for over a year. The Serb is now healthy and all set to crack the top 100 for the first time after qualifying for the main draw.

Krajinovic has won 2 ATP Challenger titles and 2 ITF Futures titles this season and he finds himself in a good section of the draw – with American Tim Smyczek in the first round, a possible second rounder against 17th seeded Roberto Bautista Agut, and a likely third round against 15th seeded Fabio Fognini, who he already beat in Hamburg earlier this year.

YOSHIHITO NISHIOKA It’s been a good week for Japanese tennis with three of their men coming through the qualifying draw to join Kei Nishikori in the main draw.

But the most surprising one of them is 18-year-old southpaw Yoshihito Nishioka, currently ranked no. 246 in the world. The 5 ft 7 inch Japanese player, who trains at the IMG Academy, scored impressive wins in qualifying over former top 40 player Horacio Zeballos and rising Aussie junior Thanasi Kokkinakis and takes on Italian Paolo Lorezni in the first round.

For the record, Taro Daniel (who meets Milos Raonic) and Tatsuma Ito (who meets American Steve Johnson) also secured main draw berths. RADU ALBOT Radu Albot has created history this week by becoming the first player from his nation, Moldova, to play the main draw of a Grand Slam.

Albot is as much an unknown quantity as his nation. (For those keen on knowing, Wikipedia says that the Republic of Moldova is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe located between Romania to its west and Ukraine to its north, east and south).

Albot is the classic case of a journeyman, having cracked the top 300 for the first time in June 2011 and shuffling around the 200 mark since (his current ranking is no. 205). Albot, who beat two seeds in the qualifying draw including Britain’s James Ward, faces the 26th seed Gilles Simon in the first round.

Others coming through the qualifying draw include – 24-year-old Argentine Facundo Bagnis who meets 22nd seeded German Philipp Kohlschreiber Three Germans came through the qualies - Andreas Beck (who plays Spain’s Pablo Carreno Busta), Peter Gojowczyk (who meets countryman Benjamin Becker) and Matthias Bachinger (who takes on Czech veteran Stepanek) Belgian Niels Desein, who runs into his red-hot countryman David Goffin, winner of 25 of his last 26 matches since Wimbledon Russian Alexander Kudryavtsev who clashes against compatriot Evgeny Donskoy And Ukrainian Illya Marchenko, who will take on fellow qualifier 33-year-old Swiss Marco Chiudinelli, who plays his first Grand Slam main draw since the 2010 US Open.

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Tennis): definition of _(tennis) and synonyms of _(tennis) (English)

US Open (tennis) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The US Open, formally the United States Open tennis championships, is a tennis tournament which is the modern incarnation of one of the oldest tennis championships in the world, with the U.S. National Championship, which for mens' singles was first contested in 1881. Since 1987, the US Open has been chronologically the fourth and final Grand Slam tennis tournament each year.

It is held annually in August and September over a two-week period (the weeks before and after Labor Day weekend). The main tournament consists of five different event championships: men's and women's singles, men's and women's doubles, and mixed doubles, with additional tournaments for senior, junior, and wheelchair players. Since 1978, the tournament has been played on acrylic hard courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, New York City.

The US Open is unique in that there are final-set tiebreaks; in the other three Grand Slam tournaments, the deciding set (fifth for men, third for women) continues until it is won by two games.

History

The US Open has grown from an exclusive entertainment event for high society to a championship for more than 600 male and female professional players who, as of 2008, compete for total prize money of over US$19 million, with $1.5 million for each winner of the singles tournaments.

In the first few years of the United States National Championship, only men competed, and only in singles competition. The tournament was first held in August 1881 at the Newport Casino, Newport, Rhode Island and in that first year only clubs that were members of the United States National Lawn Tennis Association were permitted to enter. From 1884 through 1911, the tournament used a challenge system whereby the defending champion automatically qualified for the next year's final. In 1915, the tournament moved to the West Side Tennis Club at Forest Hills, New York. From 1921 through 1923, it was played at the Germantown Cricket Club in Philadelphia and returned to Forest Hills in 1924.

Six years after the men's nationals were first held, the first official U.S. Women's National Singles Championship was held at the Philadelphia Cricket Club in 1887, followed by the U.S. Women's National Doubles Championship in 1889. The first U.S. Mixed Doubles Championship was held alongside the women's singles and doubles. The first U.S. National Men's Doubles Championship was held in 1900. Tournaments were held in the east and the west of the country to determine the best two teams, which competed in a play-off to see who would play the defending champions in the challenge round.

The open era began in 1968 when all five events were merged into the US Open, held at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, New York. The 1968 combined tournament was open to professionals for the first time. That year, 96 men and 63 women entered the event, and prize money totaled $100,000 ($612,476 in current dollar terms).

In 1970, the US Open became the first of the Grand Slam tournaments to use a tiebreak at the end of a set. The US Open is also the only Grand Slam that continues to use the tiebreak in the 5th set. All the other three grand slams play it out with service games in the 5th set.

The US Open was originally played on grass until Forest Hills switched to Har-Tru clay courts in 1975 for three years. In 1978, the event moved north from Forest Hills to its current home at nearby Flushing Meadows and the surface changed again, to the current DecoTurf.

Jimmy Connors is the only individual to have won US Open singles titles on all three surfaces, while Chris Evert is the only woman to win on two surfaces.

Player challenges of line calls

In 2006, the US Open became the first Grand Slam tournament to implement instant replay reviews of calls, using the Hawk-Eye computer system. Each player was allowed three challenges per set plus one additional challenge during a tiebreak. The player keeps all 3 challenges if the challenge is successful. If the challenge is unsuccessful and the original ruling is upheld, the player loses a challenge. Instant replay was initially available only on the stadium courts (Ashe and Armstrong), until became available on the Grandstand in 2009.

Once a challenge is made, the official review (a 3-D computer simulation based on multiple high-speed video cameras) is shown to the players, umpires, and audience on the stadium video boards and to the television audience at the same time. The system is said to be accurate to within five millimetres, resulting in an accuracy of 99.2%.

During the 2006 US Open, 30.5% of men's challenges and 35.85% of women's challenges were overturned. [ 1 ] During the 2007 US Open, 95 challenges were overturned - or 30.6%. [citation needed]

The DecoTurf surface at the US Open is a fast surface, having slightly less friction and producing a lower bounce compared to other hard courts (most notably the Rebound Ace surface formerly used at the Australian Open). For this reason, many serve-and-volley players have found success at the US Open.

The main court is located at the 24,000-seat Arthur Ashe Stadium, opened in 1997. It is named after Arthur Ashe, the African American tennis player who won the men's final of the inaugural US Open in 1968. The next largest court is Louis Armstrong Stadium, opened in 1978, extensively renovated from the original Singer Bowl. It was the main stadium from 1978-96, and its peak capacity neared 18,000 seats, but was reduced to 10,000 after the opening of Arthur Ashe Stadium. The third largest court is the Grandstand Stadium, attached to the Louis Armstrong Stadium. Sidecourts 4, 7, and 11 each have a seating capacity of over 1,000.

All the courts used by the US Open are lit, meaning that television coverage of the tournament can extend into prime time to attract higher ratings. This has recently been used to the advantage of the USA Network on cable and especially for CBS, the American broadcast television outlet for the tournament for many years, which used its influence to move the women's singles final to Saturday night to draw better television ratings. [citation needed]

In 2005, all US Open (and US Open Series) tennis courts were given blue inner courts to make it easier to see the ball on television; the outer courts remained green.

The USTA National Tennis Center was renamed in honor of four-time tournament champion and tennis pioneer Billie Jean King during the 2006 US Open.

Prize money

The total prize money for the 2008 US Open (in US dollars) is divided as follows:

Singles (men & women - 128 player draws) Doubles (Per Team, Men & Women - 64 Draws) Mixed Doubles (Per Team - 32 Draws) Men's and Women's Qualifying (128 Draws) Champions Past champions Current champions

Juan Martín del Potro defeated Roger Federer in five sets in 2009. This is his first slam title of his career.

Kim Clijsters won the title over Caroline Wozniacki in 2009. This is her second slam title of her career, and the second US Open Women's Singles title.

Lukáš Dlouhý part of the winning men's doubles team in 2009. This is his second men's doubles slam title of his career, and first US Open Men's Doubles title. Also, the second men's doubles slam of the year with the French title..

Leander Paes part of the winning men's doubles team in 2009. This is his sixth men's doubles slam title of his career, and second US Open Men's Doubles title. Also, the second men's doubles slam of the year with the French title.

Serena Williams part of the winning women's doubles team in 2009. This is her tenth women's doubles slam title of her career, and second US Open Women's Doubles title. Also, this is the third women's doubles slam title of the year, along with the Australian and Wimbledon crowns.

Venus Williams part of the winning women's doubles team in 2009. This is her tenth women's doubles slam title of her career, and second US Open Women's Doubles title. Also, this is the third women's doubles slam title of the year, along with the Australian and Wimbledon crowns.

Carly Gullickson part of the winning mixed doubles team in 2009. This is her first mixed doubles slam title of her career.

Travis Parrott (not pictured) part of the winning mixed doubles team in 2009. This is his first mixed doubles slam title of his career.

Men's Singles titles

1901, 1902, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911

1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1929

1990, 1993, 1995, 1996, 2002

2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008

Men's Singles titles

Men's Doubles titles

1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887

1968, 1974, 1978, 1980

1979, 1981, 1983, 1989

Men's Doubles titles

1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887

Mixed Doubles titles - Men

1943, 1944, 1945, 1946

(total: singles, men's doubles,

mixed doubles) - Men

Women's Singles titles

Women's Singles titles

1932, 1933, 1934, 1935

Women's Doubles titles

Women's Doubles titles

Mixed Doubles titles - Women

1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1969, 1970, 1972

(total: singles, women's doubles,

mixed doubles) - women

1961-1975 (5 singles, 5 women's doubles, 8 mixed doubles)

Men's singles Women's singles Media coverage
  • The 2008 Open was broadcast in the United States on CBS Sports and the USA Network.
  • Beginning in 2009, the tournament will be broadcast on CBS, ESPN2, and Tennis Channel.
  • The tournament is broadcast in Canada on TSN, TSN HD, and TSN2.
  • The tournament is broadcast in the United Kingdom on Sky Sports 2, Sky Sports Xtra, and on Eurosport for the UK and Germany.
  • In the Netherlands the US Open is broadcast on Eurosport
  • In Belgium, the US Open is broadcast on public broadcasters [[Eén],Canvas and on commercial channel Eurosport.
  • In Spain, the tournament is broadcast on Digital Plus and Antena 3.
  • In India and Pakistan, the US Open is broadcast on the channel Ten Sports.
  • In Japan, the tournament has been broadcast on WOWOW since 1992.
References
  1. ^"Replay Statistics". US Open official homepage . http://2007.usopen.org/en_US/scores/instant_replay/instant_replay.html .
  2. ^ abcd2009 "US Open Base Prize Money Tops Record $21.6 Million"
External links US Open (tennis) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The US Open, formally the United States Open tennis championships, is a tennis tournament which is the modern incarnation of one of the oldest tennis championships in the world, with the U.S. National Championship, which for mens' singles was first contested in 1881. Since 1987, the US Open has been chronologically the fourth and final Grand Slam tennis tournament each year.

It is held annually in August and September over a two-week period (the weeks before and after Labor Day weekend). The main tournament consists of five different event championships: men's and women's singles, men's and women's doubles, and mixed doubles, with additional tournaments for senior, junior, and wheelchair players. Since 1978, the tournament has been played on acrylic hard courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, New York City.

The US Open is unique in that there are final-set tiebreaks; in the other three Grand Slam tournaments, the deciding set (fifth for men, third for women) continues until it is won by two games.

History

The US Open has grown from an exclusive entertainment event for high society to a championship for more than 600 male and female professional players who, as of 2008, compete for total prize money of over US$19 million, with $1.5 million for each winner of the singles tournaments.

In the first few years of the United States National Championship, only men competed, and only in singles competition. The tournament was first held in August 1881 at the Newport Casino, Newport, Rhode Island and in that first year only clubs that were members of the United States National Lawn Tennis Association were permitted to enter. From 1884 through 1911, the tournament used a challenge system whereby the defending champion automatically qualified for the next year's final. In 1915, the tournament moved to the West Side Tennis Club at Forest Hills, New York. From 1921 through 1923, it was played at the Germantown Cricket Club in Philadelphia and returned to Forest Hills in 1924.

Six years after the men's nationals were first held, the first official U.S. Women's National Singles Championship was held at the Philadelphia Cricket Club in 1887, followed by the U.S. Women's National Doubles Championship in 1889. The first U.S. Mixed Doubles Championship was held alongside the women's singles and doubles. The first U.S. National Men's Doubles Championship was held in 1900. Tournaments were held in the east and the west of the country to determine the best two teams, which competed in a play-off to see who would play the defending champions in the challenge round.

The open era began in 1968 when all five events were merged into the US Open, held at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, New York. The 1968 combined tournament was open to professionals for the first time. That year, 96 men and 63 women entered the event, and prize money totaled $100,000 ($612,476 in current dollar terms).

In 1970, the US Open became the first of the Grand Slam tournaments to use a tiebreak at the end of a set. The US Open is also the only Grand Slam that continues to use the tiebreak in the 5th set. All the other three grand slams play it out with service games in the 5th set.

The US Open was originally played on grass until Forest Hills switched to Har-Tru clay courts in 1975 for three years. In 1978, the event moved north from Forest Hills to its current home at nearby Flushing Meadows and the surface changed again, to the current DecoTurf.

Jimmy Connors is the only individual to have won US Open singles titles on all three surfaces, while Chris Evert is the only woman to win on two surfaces.

Player challenges of line calls

In 2006, the US Open became the first Grand Slam tournament to implement instant replay reviews of calls, using the Hawk-Eye computer system. Each player was allowed three challenges per set plus one additional challenge during a tiebreak. The player keeps all 3 challenges if the challenge is successful. If the challenge is unsuccessful and the original ruling is upheld, the player loses a challenge. Instant replay was initially available only on the stadium courts (Ashe and Armstrong), until became available on the Grandstand in 2009.

Once a challenge is made, the official review (a 3-D computer simulation based on multiple high-speed video cameras) is shown to the players, umpires, and audience on the stadium video boards and to the television audience at the same time. The system is said to be accurate to within five millimetres, resulting in an accuracy of 99.2%.

During the 2006 US Open, 30.5% of men's challenges and 35.85% of women's challenges were overturned. [ 1 ] During the 2007 US Open, 95 challenges were overturned - or 30.6%. [citation needed]

The DecoTurf surface at the US Open is a fast surface, having slightly less friction and producing a lower bounce compared to other hard courts (most notably the Rebound Ace surface formerly used at the Australian Open). For this reason, many serve-and-volley players have found success at the US Open.

The main court is located at the 24,000-seat Arthur Ashe Stadium, opened in 1997. It is named after Arthur Ashe, the African American tennis player who won the men's final of the inaugural US Open in 1968. The next largest court is Louis Armstrong Stadium, opened in 1978, extensively renovated from the original Singer Bowl. It was the main stadium from 1978-96, and its peak capacity neared 18,000 seats, but was reduced to 10,000 after the opening of Arthur Ashe Stadium. The third largest court is the Grandstand Stadium, attached to the Louis Armstrong Stadium. Sidecourts 4, 7, and 11 each have a seating capacity of over 1,000.

All the courts used by the US Open are lit, meaning that television coverage of the tournament can extend into prime time to attract higher ratings. This has recently been used to the advantage of the USA Network on cable and especially for CBS, the American broadcast television outlet for the tournament for many years, which used its influence to move the women's singles final to Saturday night to draw better television ratings. [citation needed]

In 2005, all US Open (and US Open Series) tennis courts were given blue inner courts to make it easier to see the ball on television; the outer courts remained green.

The USTA National Tennis Center was renamed in honor of four-time tournament champion and tennis pioneer Billie Jean King during the 2006 US Open.

Prize money

The total prize money for the 2008 US Open (in US dollars) is divided as follows:

Singles (men & women - 128 player draws) Doubles (Per Team, Men & Women - 64 Draws) Mixed Doubles (Per Team - 32 Draws) Men's and Women's Qualifying (128 Draws) Champions Past champions Current champions

Juan Martín del Potro defeated Roger Federer in five sets in 2009. This is his first slam title of his career.

Kim Clijsters won the title over Caroline Wozniacki in 2009. This is her second slam title of her career, and the second US Open Women's Singles title.

Lukáš Dlouhý part of the winning men's doubles team in 2009. This is his second men's doubles slam title of his career, and first US Open Men's Doubles title. Also, the second men's doubles slam of the year with the French title..

Leander Paes part of the winning men's doubles team in 2009. This is his sixth men's doubles slam title of his career, and second US Open Men's Doubles title. Also, the second men's doubles slam of the year with the French title.

Serena Williams part of the winning women's doubles team in 2009. This is her tenth women's doubles slam title of her career, and second US Open Women's Doubles title. Also, this is the third women's doubles slam title of the year, along with the Australian and Wimbledon crowns.

Venus Williams part of the winning women's doubles team in 2009. This is her tenth women's doubles slam title of her career, and second US Open Women's Doubles title. Also, this is the third women's doubles slam title of the year, along with the Australian and Wimbledon crowns.

Carly Gullickson part of the winning mixed doubles team in 2009. This is her first mixed doubles slam title of her career.

Travis Parrott (not pictured) part of the winning mixed doubles team in 2009. This is his first mixed doubles slam title of his career.

Men's Singles titles

1901, 1902, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911

1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1929

1990, 1993, 1995, 1996, 2002

2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008

Men's Singles titles

Men's Doubles titles

1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887

1968, 1974, 1978, 1980

1979, 1981, 1983, 1989

Men's Doubles titles

1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887

Mixed Doubles titles - Men

1943, 1944, 1945, 1946

(total: singles, men's doubles,

mixed doubles) - Men

Women's Singles titles

Women's Singles titles

1932, 1933, 1934, 1935

Women's Doubles titles

Women's Doubles titles

Mixed Doubles titles - Women

1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1969, 1970, 1972

(total: singles, women's doubles,

mixed doubles) - women

1961-1975 (5 singles, 5 women's doubles, 8 mixed doubles)

Men's singles Women's singles Media coverage
  • The 2008 Open was broadcast in the United States on CBS Sports and the USA Network.
  • Beginning in 2009, the tournament will be broadcast on CBS, ESPN2, and Tennis Channel.
  • The tournament is broadcast in Canada on TSN, TSN HD, and TSN2.
  • The tournament is broadcast in the United Kingdom on Sky Sports 2, Sky Sports Xtra, and on Eurosport for the UK and Germany.
  • In the Netherlands the US Open is broadcast on Eurosport
  • In Belgium, the US Open is broadcast on public broadcasters [[Eén],Canvas and on commercial channel Eurosport.
  • In Spain, the tournament is broadcast on Digital Plus and Antena 3.
  • In India and Pakistan, the US Open is broadcast on the channel Ten Sports.
  • In Japan, the tournament has been broadcast on WOWOW since 1992.
References
  1. ^"Replay Statistics". US Open official homepage . http://2007.usopen.org/en_US/scores/instant_replay/instant_replay.html .
  2. ^ abcd2009 "US Open Base Prize Money Tops Record $21.6 Million"
External links

All translations of U.S._Open_(tennis)

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