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Group Tennis Games: Jail and Around the World

Group Tennis Games: Jail and Around the World

Camps, schools, and summer recreation programs sometimes find themselves with large numbers of kids on a court and in need of a safe, fun tennis game for the group. Here are two excellent options:

Beginner and advanced beginner: 4-20 players

The kids line up at one end of the court. Feed from the opposite side of the net. Each kid gets a certain number of chances to get a forehand or backhand into the doubles court.

If she gets one in, she is safe. If not, she goes to jail: she goes to the other end of the court where she'll try to catch a ball hit by another player. If she makes her catch, she is free from jail, and the player she caught goes to jail. When only one player is left, she tries to get three shots in that don't get caught before she misses three. If she succeeds, she wins the game. If someone catches one of her shots, it's a jailbreak: everyone is free, and a new round begins.

  • Give weaker players three chances, stronger just one, and vary the depth of which they hit according to their abilities.
  • Let weaker catchers catch after one bounce in jail. Very small kids can simply touch a ball in the air to be freed.
  • If jail starts to get crowded, limit the prisoners to two steps to get to a ball. That will keep the more aggressive players from running into or in front of other players.
  • Keep the playing area clear of loose balls.

Around the World

Advanced beginner through advanced: 5 - 16 players

Half of the kids line up at one baseline, half at the other. Feed one of the kids at the front of his line. He must hit into the singles court, then run to the end of the line at the opposite end of the court. The kid at the front of the opposite line does the same.

The rally continues, with each player hitting the ball, then running around the net. When a player misses, he gets an out. With three outs, he drops out of the game. Once only two players are left, they no longer run around the net: they simply play points (still from a feed) until one of them has three outs.

  • Stand next to one of the net posts to feed.
  • Players must always run to their right.
  • Remind players to give the current hitter plenty of room to move back for deep balls.
  • When a player misses, send the next feed to the player to whom the missed shot was supposed to go.
  • Players who get out may go to an adjacent court to hit.
  • Make sure the running path is free of obstructions and loose balls.

Other articles

Group tennis games for kids

group tennis games for kids [Summary] Fun kids tennis game for sending & receiving skills (5-7 years / Red) http://www.tenniscoachblog.com - here's a a simple and fun game for children which teaches them sending, and receiving skills and also gets them to hand feed. Dodge Ball Part of Fun kids tennis game for sending & receiving skills (5-7 years / Red)

http://www.tenniscoachblog.com - here's a a simple and fun game for children which teaches them sending, and receiving skills and also gets them to hand feed.

Dodge Ball

Part of "My Daddy / My Coach - live tennis lesson no. 13", this fun tennis game for kids is excellent for quick reaction and footwork. See more tennis games and drills for kids at https://www.webtennis24.com/

Big Groups Tennis Drills, Videos and Coaching Plans

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Little kids drills | Tennis Coach Blog

Here’s a very simple agility game which you can do as a warm up or in the ABCS section of your lesson (Agility / Balance / Co-ordination / Speed).

In our video here, you’ll see that the group is a bit too small for it to work well. You want 6 or more kids really. Also, you can do it with very large groups as you can split them into 2 or 3 circles.

Tennis Warm Up Games For Kids - with Karl Stowell

http://www.tenniscoachblog.com - This is a training session where I am showing some of our tennis camp assistants some tennis warm ups to do with kids. Some .

Tennis Games

Smash your opponents to win the championship in this collection of tennis games. If you love racket sports but you can't get out on the court, these games will serve you up some excitement whether you have a few minutes to spare or an entire afternoon.

There are plenty of classic tennis games to choose from. Tennis Stars Cup is billed as one of the most realistic tennis experiences online. Let this rag-tag bunch of kids guide you through the game to win. In Tennis Champions you will have to smash your way to the top of the tennis tournament. You can even play on the most fabled court of them all – without leaving your couch. In Wimbledon Tennis, step onto the court and play against the top female tennis players in the world. You will have to be a real pro to win the Wimbledon tournament in Centre Court.

Tennis Drill for Large Group

On one side there are two players (team A-B) who are the “Champs” – on the baseline; on the other side there is another team of two players (team C-D) on the baseline. There is a substitute team (E-F), waiting for their turn. One feeder (F) on the side with teams C-D and E-F.

The feeder sends a ball to team A-B; team C-D moves up to the net. They play the point out. If team C-D loses the point, they move out and team E-F steps in to play team A-B. But, if team C-D wins the first point, they stay at the net attempting to win 3 points in a row, playing the points from the “both up” position (at the net). Winning three points in a row will give them the chance to replace team A-B.

So, if either team C-D or E-F win three points in a row they will replace team A-B. If they lose, they are out.

[Further reading]

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Tennis Game - Play Games For Free

Tennis

On Online-Games-Zone.com you will find tons of free online games, which you can play right in your browser. All online games are for FREE and you can play them online, so you never need to install any programs on your personal computer at home or at work. Enjoy our website and have fun playing Tennis.

This is an awesome Tennis game with great graphics and entertaining game play! You can play an Exhibition match against the computer to train yourself and then prepare to take part in the Tournament. Select your player to begin with, each player has different skill levels. You've to play against a random opponent in the first round. Defeat your opponent to proceed to the next round. Win all the matches to grab the championship tittle. Use the arrow keys to move around the court and press the spacebar to smash the ball. The ball moves in the direction of the arrow key pressed. While serving the ball, press the spacebar to toss the ball upwards and then press the spacebar again to hit the ball.

Tennis Group Drills for Games and Practice

Tennis Group Drills for Games and Practice Tennis group drills are suitable for adults and juniors and often consist of practice games and drills that focus on the fun aspect of the game. A tennis group drill can be practiced in either large or small groups.

Learning how to play tennis, just like any other activity, is more fun and exciting when you’re in a group or class.

The social aspect of the game is also introduced when groups of players come together to learn at the same time. To teach the skills of tennis to a class, tennis group drills have been formulated. These drills are meant to be fun and entertaining while also developing the skills of each participating player.

Tennis group drills are usually named similarly as children’s games. The names are not standard; there are some drills that a coach will call by one name and another teaching pro will call by another. Here are some common ones:

Tennis Group Drill #1: The Jail Game

This is a tennis group drill that can accommodate anywhere from 4 to 20 players. It can be played by all skill levels. In this drill, the players line up at one end of the court and are fed the ball from across the net.

Each player must hit the ball back over the net within the lines. Depending on their skill level, you can require the player to hit within the doubles lines, singles lines or to specific targets on the court.

You can drill either the forehand or backhand. The objective for the player is to hit the ball to the specified location. If successful, he or she is safe, but if not, then the player must go to “jail.” You can vary this by giving less skilful players more chances. For example, you can give beginners three chances while more advanced players should get only one chance.

Going to jail means that the player must go to the other side of the court and try to catch a ball hit by another player.

Catching the ball also depends on the skill level of the player. Weaker players can catch after the bounce.

Small children may simply touch the ball to “catch” it. More advanced players must make a secure catch before the ball bounces, meaning they must not drop the ball.

Therefore, they must also be able to judge whether a ball seems to be going out of bounds or not. A successful catch gets the player out of jail, while the player who hit the ball that was caught becomes the new prisoner. When the jail becomes more and more crowded, limit the prisoners to only two steps when trying to catch a ball.

The last player will try to hit three shots that don’t get caught in order to be declared as the winner of the game. If the ball gets caught or if the player misses, then a “jailbreak” happens. Everyone gets out of jail and a new game begins.

Tennis Group Drills #2: Around the World Game

This tennis group drill is also versatile as it can be used for beginners, intermediates and advanced players. It is suitable for anywhere from 5 to 16 players. Divide the group into two, with each group lining up on the opposite baselines. The coach stands near one of the net posts to feed a ball to the player in front of one line.

This player must hit the ball into the court. Once again, you can vary the targets depending on the skill level of the players. After hitting, the player must run to his or her right around the net post and to the opposite end of the court. The player at the front of the line of the other group does the same thing.

This process continues. If a player misses his or her shot, an out is called. The next feed will be to the player who was supposed to receive the missed shot. Three outs drop a player out of the game. The last two remaining players simply play points from a feed until one of them has three outs. The last player is the winner.

Tennis Group Drill #3: The Lob Game

This tennis group drill is meant for intermediate to advanced players. It is a fast-paced game that can be played by a large group of players. The players line up by the net post to the right of the feeder. One player is designated the attacker. He or she sets up on the centre line between the net and the service line. Another player is the chaser. He or she is the one at the front of the line of players at the net post.

This player runs over to the middle of the net on the other side of the court to tag the centre strap with his or her racket. After tagging, the coach, from behind the baseline, feeds a lob down the middle.

The chaser runs down the lob, after which, he or she plays the point against the attacker. If the attacker wins the point, he or she remains as the attacker. You can set a maximum number of points in a row which the attacker can win, after which he or she gets replaced. However, if the chaser wins the point, he or she must immediately run around the net opposite the line of players and assume the attacker’s role. The next player in line will now be the chaser and will do exactly the same thing that was done in the previous point. This is a fast paced game.

Players must move the instant after points are won or lost. A lot of the action occurs while the ball is hanging in the air. Players are encouraged to do whatever they can to try to win the point against the attacker. They can practice their lobs, passing shots and dipping shots. The attacker gets to hone his or her net skills.

Tennis Group Drills #4: Drill for 5

This tennis group drill is a fast paced game that hones players’ doubles skills. This is appropriate for intermediate to advanced players. Two players take position up at net with a third player on the baseline behind them. Two other players stand on the opposite baseline. The coach or teaching pro may be one of the players at net or be feeding the ball from near one of the alleys.

The first point begins with a feed to the forehand of the player on the baseline deuce side. The point is played out. The net players try to win the points with aggressive shots – overheads and different kinds of volleys.

The baseline player behind them will retrieve shots that pass them. The two baseline players on the other side of the net try to win the points with defensive shots – lobs, passing shots and dipping shots. The second point begins with a feed to the forehand of the player on the baseline ad side. In the third point, the ball is fed to the backhand of the baseline deuce side player while in the fourth point the ball is fed to the backhand of the baseline ad side player.

This cycle continues throughout the game until one team wins by scoring at least ten points with a two point margin.

Rotate the players clockwise for the next set. The coach, however, stays in his position throughout the drill.

Tennis Group Drill #5: Pick up 10

This tennis group drill requires at least six players in order to form two teams with a minimum of three players each. The players line up on opposite sides of the court with the first player from each team standing at the centre hash mark on the baseline. The coach spins a racket or flips a coin to determine which team gets the strike.

Ten balls are placed in a basket at the centre net strap on each side of the net. When the coach gives the go signal, the players at the front of each line run to the net. The player with the strike gets a ball and runs back to a marker or cone midway between the service line and the baseline. The player turns and drop hits the ball to the opposing team’s court.

Meanwhile, the player from the opposite team, who had also run forward to the net, must touch the basket and sprint back to touch the centre hash mark of his team’s baseline. Immediately, he or she must turn to hit back the ball. The rally is played out until one team wins the point. Their team now gets to be designated as the strike team.

The players who played the first point go to the back of their respective lines while the players who are next in line begin the whole process again and the game continues. The winning team is the first team to empty their basket of balls.

Tennis Group Drills #6: Moonball Game

This drill requires the players to pair up. One pair is designated as the champions. The other pairs are the challengers and they go to the other side of the court. The first pair of challengers will play a point against the champions. The coach feeds the ball to the champions. The challengers will try to win two consecutive points against the champions.

Once they have done so, a lob is fed to the champions’ court. The challengers must run to the champions’ court to try to return the lob or moonball. The dethroned champions move to the back of the line. The next pair in line will play the ensuing point against the pair who has run down the lob.

If the pair who had run down the lob wins the point, they are the new champions. The pair they defeated will move to the back of the line and a new pair of challengers will play against them. The process repeats itself. However, if they lose the point, the next team will do exactly as they have done and try to run down a lob fed to the champions’ court. This process continues until a pair wins a moonball point.

Tennis Group Drill #7: Team 105

This tennis group drill is great for developing an aggressive, attacking game. It is suitable for up to 20 people and requires the players to be divided into two teams. The teams take up their positions on opposite sides of the court. Players from each team pair up and play doubles points against the opposing team as if playing a standard doubles match. However, the scoring system is different.

An unforced error is 1 point. A winner from the baseline (including service aces) is 5 points, while a volley winner is 10 points. An overhead winner scores the highest number of points at 25. This rewards the team who gets to the net and tries to finish up there. Pairs represent their teams as long as they are winning points and they are replaced by the next pair on their team as soon as they lose a point. Based on the scoring system, the first team to reach 105 points will be the winner.

Tennis Group Drills #8: Space Invaders

In this game, a group of 8 or 10 players is divided into two teams. Both teams spread out along the service line. The coach feeds a ball to one player who must volley the ball to the other team. The rally is played out until one player makes a mistake. This player is then knocked out of the game. The game continues until one team loses all players.

Tennis Group Drill #9: Kings of the Court

This is a popular tennis group drill. It is similar to the moonball drill described above, except that the “champions” are called “kings.” This team takes their position at the net and plays points against the challenging teams. The challenging team is fed a ball to begin each point. They must win 2 out of 3 points to dethrone the kings.

Once they do so, they must immediately run to the kings’ court as the next ball is lobbed over to the next pair of challengers. If the kings win 2 out of 3 points, their challengers move to the back of the line and are replaced by the next pair in line. The first pair to win 10 times as kings wins the entire game.

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Tennis games - The Full Wiki

The Full Wiki More info on Tennis games
  • Wikis
    • Encyclopedia
      • Singles Games
        • One Ball Live
        • Tag Team Singles
        • King of the Court
        • Champs and Chumps
        • On-Off Singles
      • Doubles Games
        • Team Doubles
        • All Position Doubles
        • King of the Court Doubles
        • Rush N' Crush
      • Group Games
        • Triples
        • Monkey in the Middle
        • Deep Desperation
        • Wipe Out
        • Around the World
        • Touch the Curtain
      • See also
      • External links
    • Related links
    • Related topics
  • Quiz
    • Quiz
Related topics Tennis games: Wikis Related top topics

Encyclopedia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tennis games are often used to help players of all abilities to practice the different strokes involved in tennis. The number of participants needed varies from as few as two players to as many players as can fit on a tennis court. These games are often used by coaches and other tennis instructors to help teach the basic skills of tennis.

Singles Games

Singles games are games that practice the strategies used when playing a match of singles.

One Ball Live

At least eight players are needed for this game. Two players start on the baseline, the back line of the tennis court, of each side with the court split in half vertically. Two tennis balls are played simultaneously on each half of the court starting with a drop hit. A drop hit is an underhand hit by bouncing the ball first. Once one player loses a point on his or her side of the court, they call out “One ball live!” and the single remaining ball is played out among the four players with the court no longer split down the middle. The team that wins this point stays, while two new players on the other side replace the losing team and the game starts over with two balls. The first team to reach ten points wins. This game is designed for use in practicing groundstrokes, the forehand and backhand, at first and then doubles strategy once "One ball live" is called.

Tag Team Singles

At least four players are needed for this game. Players are split into two teams. Each team lines up behind the middle of the baseline. One player from each team will start the game off and step up to the baseline. Either player can start the point. Once a player has hit the ball, he or she goes to the end of their line and the next player in line will hit their team’s next shot. The same happens for the other team. The point continues until one team makes a mistake. The first team to win ten points is the winner. This game is designed to work on consistency in the players groundstrokes.

King of the Court

Three or more players are needed for this game. One person, designated as the “king” or “queen,” goes to the opposite side of the court. The other players make a line behind the baseline of the current side. One challenger steps up and plays a singles point against the “king.” The point is started with either a serve or a drop hit. If the challenger wins, they replace the “king” on the other side of the court. Variations of this game include the challenger having to win two or three points in a row. This game practices playing a singles point.

Champs and Chumps

Six or more players are needed for this game. An equal amount of players line up behind each baseline. One side is designated the chumps while the other is designated the champs. A player from each line steps up and plays out a singles point. The point is started with either a drop hit or a serve. The winner of the point goes to the end of the champs’ line while the loser goes to the end of the chump’s line. The game is played for a designated time, and once time is called, the players on the champs side are the winners. This game practices playing a singles point.

On-Off Singles

This was designed when there is a lack of courts. If singles is preferred, over doubles with 4 players. 2 players face off in a separate match and the other 2 have a separate match. The two matches share the court with each match alternating play per point. (two people play their singles point, then alternate as the other two players play their singles point).

Doubles Games

Doubles games are games that practice the different strategies used in a match of doubles.

Team Doubles

Six or more players are needed for this game. Four players line up in the typical doubles starting positions. The typical doubles starting positions are with one player serving and his partner on the other side of his side of the court at the net. The returning team has a player at the service line in front of the server and a player at the baseline on the other side of the court. The other players wait to play in a line behind the serving or returning players. One team serves the ball and the point is played out. Once the point is over, each side of the court rotates. On the serving side: the server rotates to the net position, the net player sits out, and a new player steps in to serve the ball. On the returning side: the return player rotates to the service line, service line player sits out, and a new player steps in to return the ball. The same team serves the ball until the game is over. The game is played until a team reaches seven or eleven points. Variations in the game include a drop hit to start the point or a coach feeding the ball to start the point. This game is designed to give each player practice at all the doubles positions.

All Position Doubles

Eight or more players are needed for this game. Four players start the first point in the normal doubles starting position. A line of one or more players is to the side of each starting position. The first point is played. Once finished, the first four players rotate in a clockwise direction to the end of the next line. Four new players play out the next point and then rotate in the same manner. The first person to win a total of 10 points wins the game. This game is designed to give each player practice at all the doubles positions.

King of the Court Doubles

Six or more players are needed for this game. One team of two players is designated as the “kings” or “queens” and goes to one side of the court. The other players make a line behind the baseline of the opposite side. One challenging team steps up and plays a doubles point against the “kings.” The point is started with either a serve or a drop hit. If the challengers win, they replace the “kings” on the other side of the court. Variations of this game include the challengers having to win two or three points in a row. This game practices playing a point of doubles.

Rush N' Crush

This game either requires an even number of players 4 or more, or any number of players more than 2 along with an individual ball feeder. The game is traditionally played with doubles teams. A doubles team is designated the rulers and begins on the baseline on the opposite side of the court. The feeder is positioned behind the rulers with respectable space to the rulers for mobility (at least 10 feet behind the line). The other doubles teams are the challengers and take turns on the opposite side of the court with a goal to win 3 points in a row to replace the current rulers. As each point begins, the rulers begin at the baseline, but are free to move anywhere once the point begins. The first point begins with the feeder feeding a short ball to the challengers allowing them to proceed to the net and an offensive. If the challengers win the first point, they remain at the net for the beginning of the next two points (they are allowed free mobility after the point begins). The feeder will randomly designate one player on the challengers team to receive an overhead (a short lob allowing the player to hit a powerful shot similar to a serve from the net), or a volley. With the third point, the other of the two challengers receives an overhead or a volley. If all three points are won the challengers take the place as the new rulers and the previous rulers proceed to the challenger's side. After a certain time, end game may be called and the current rulers are designated as the winners (The power to call end game may go to the feeder). This game was designed to train and encourage aggressiveness and a goal in doubles to move to the net to finish the point. It also trains groundstrokes volleys, and overheads, along with possible use of slices and drop-shots. A super-shot rule may also be put into effect. Here, a feeder may decide at a random time (either the 2nd or 3rd point) to drive a volley between the two challengers. If neither player touches the ball it is called a super-shot and the challengers could be penalized (may run laps, do pushups etc.). With this rule, the game also trains communication between a doubles team.

Group Games

Group games are games that generally involve more than four people on the court at a time.

Players are divided into teams of three to six players. Each team forms a triangle on each side of the court with one person at the net. Extra players wait behind the baseline. A ball is fed by a coach or player that is sitting out and the point is played using the doubles court. Once the point is over, players rotate clockwise on their respective sides. If there are more than three players, rotate players in and out. The first team to ten points wins. This game is designed to help the net player become more aggressive at the net.

Monkey in the Middle

This game is played in triples formation (a triangle with two players behind the baseline and the third in the team at the net). The game can be played with a feeder positioned off of the court, usually by the net, or without the feeder. A point is begun by feeding the ball to one of the baseline players on either team. The point is played out. Each point is worth one point. If the net player (also known as the monkey), hits a winner, the player earns his/her team 2 points. The next point is begun with a ball being fed to the opposite side of the team that just won the point(s). Games are played to any score 10n + 1 (ex: 11, 21, 31 etc.).

Deep Desperation

Two players go to the baseline of one side of the court as the champs. Two other players go to the net on the opposite side of the champs. These are the challengers. The other players wait at the side of the net post in pairs ready to replace the challengers. The coach lobs a ball over the challenger’s heads and the challengers have to run down the lob and play out the point (after it bounces). If the challengers win the point, they replace the champs and the old champs go to the end of the challengers line. If they lose, they go to the back of the challenger’s line at the net post. This game is designed to practice running down a lob and getting back into the point. This game is also designed to promote net play and aggressiveness, and shot placement.

Players are divided into two teams and wait with one team behind each baseline. One player from each team steps up and a singles point is played out starting with a drop hit. The person that wins adds another player from their team to the court while the player that loses goes to the end of their line and a new player replaces him or her. This next point is played one vs. two with the team with only one person on the court starting the ball. The team with one person on the court can use the doubles court while the team with multiple people on the court has to use the singles court. If the team with two people on the court wins, they add another player and play one vs. three. If they lose, all players on the court on that team go to the end of the line and one player replaces them. The other team, the winning team, adds another player to the court. If playing against one player, singles court must be used. If playing against two or more players, doubles court can be used. The game continues until an entire team is on the court and wins the point. This game is designed to practice ball placement.

Around the World

Four or more players are needed for this game. The players are split up evenly on each side of the court and line up behind the baseline. One player from each side steps up to the baseline. Either player feeds the ball and runs to the end of the line on the other side of the court. The person that receives the feed hits the ball and also runs to the end of the line on the other side of the court. The next person in line will hit the next shot and so on. The point continues until an error is made. This process is repeated. Once a person has made three errors, he or she sits out. The last person to make three errors wins. Once the game is down to two people, instead of running to the other side, the person has to hit the ball, drop their racquet, spin around, and continue the point. This game is designed to practice hitting that first shot of each point without first being in a rhythm.

Touch the Curtain

This game requires that there is a wall behind both baselines on the court. 4 individual players take the court with 2 on each side positioned at the baseline. Any extra players will line up by the net post as substitutes. The game also requires a feeder, one who will stand out of the game with a large basket of balls quickly putting a new ball into play once the previous ball is out of play. When the game begins, the 4 players on the court rally the ball back and forth with freedom of mobility and aggressiveness. Each player's main goal is to not be eliminated from the game by falling to a winner (a ball that bounces on the player's court twice). When an individual player mishits the ball, the player is substituted with the next person in line while the feeder immediately puts a ball into play to the opposite (unharmed) side. When a winner is hit, the player within who's court the ball lands (half the court being divided vertically as well), this player is eliminated from the game (it is also popular that a super-shot, or a winner hit through the middle of the court without a definite decision to which player is eliminated, results in both players on that side being eliminated from the game). As more eliminations occur the number of substitutes decrease. When only 4 players remain in the game (no substitutes) a mistake is penalized with the player running back and touching the wall behind the baseline while a ball is put into play in the opposite side allowing the other duo to hit a winner. With 3 players remaining, the same rules apply but the single player only needs to defend a singles court. When 2 players remain, they can decide between themselves to touch the wall, or any other penalty (Dropping the racquet and spinning a full circle is a popular penalty). With that set rule, the 2 players play on a complete singles court until one player remains to be designated the winner. Once a new game begins, the highest ranking players from the previous game usually begin as the substitutes with the winner substituting last, and the runner-up substituting next to last etc. This game is designed to work on the advanced skill of consistency after running to a shot, shot placement, and builds stamina.

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